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1. Do you speak american? up north.   Publication: Princeton, NJ: Films for the Humanities & Sciences, 2005 . 57 mins. ; color. , VOLUME ONE: UP NORTH: In this program, Robert MacNeil canvasses the North to learn firsthand about linguistic dialect zones, the tension between prescriptivism and descriptivism, the northern cities vowel shift, the roots of African-American English, minority dialects and linguistic profiling, biases against nonstandard speech, and the general perception of the U.S. Midland dialect as "normal American." Hip-hop street talk, IM slang, Pittsburghese, and Gullah and Geechee are sampled, and Bill Labov, the dean of American linguists. Language at times is colloquially rich and some may find it offensive. Date: 2005 Availability: No items available:

2. Do you speak american? down south.   Publication: Princeton Films for the Humanities & Sciences 2005 , VOLUME TWO: DOWN SOUTH. This program follows Robert MacNeil down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Appalachia, Louisiana Cajun country, and the Tex-Mex border to examine Southern dialects and accents and the influences of French and Spanish on American English. Linguist Walt Wolfram, columnist Molly Ivins, pop country singer Cody James, and others talk about regional differences in vernacular, the steady displacement of Southern coastal dialect by inland dialect, the accents of JFK and LBJ, and the Texas border town of El Cenizo, where Spanish is the official language. Recordings of Eudora Welty and Appalachian storyteller Ray Hicks are included, as well as WPA recordings from around 1940. Date: 2005 Availability: No items available:

3. Do you speak American? out west.   Publication: Princeton, NJ: Films for the Humanities & Sciences, 2005 . 57 mins.; color. , VOLUME THREE: OUT WEST: In this program, Robert MacNeil heads to California to take part in meaningful dialogues on Spanglish, Chicano, Ebonics, and "Surfer Dude" before going to Seattle to consider the implications of voice- activation technology. Linguist Carmen Fought, Stanford University's Cliff Nass, screenwriters Amy Heckerling and Winnie Holtzman, and others speak their minds about Spanish in America, why teens create their own language, gay self-empowerment by redefining discriminatory terms, the oo-fronting sound shift, and whether technology will reinforce or weaken racial/regional stereotypes. The teaching of standard English without devaluing or denigrating cultural linguistic differences is addressed. Language at times is colloquially rich and some may find it offensive. Date: 2005 Availability: No items available:

4. Making the message : the fight for the Presidency / narrator, Linda Emond ; commentary, Maureen Dowd ... [et al.] ; originally broadcast as a segment on the Discovery channel's television series Discovery spotlight.   Publication: [Princeton, N.J.] : Films for the Humanities & Sciences, 2004 . 1 DVD (88 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in. , This behind-the-scenes account of the 2004 Republican and Democratic conventions examines how presidential candidates build their platforms and generate momentum. Includes interviews with convention chairmen, campaign strategists, members of special interest groups, and journalists. Date: 2004 Availability: No items available:

5. Do you speak american? up north.   Publication: Princeton, NJ: Films for the Humanities & Sciences, 2005 . 57 mins. ; color. , VOLUME ONE: UP NORTH: In this program, Robert MacNeil canvasses the North to learn firsthand about linguistic dialect zones, the tension between prescriptivism and descriptivism, the northern cities vowel shift, the roots of African-American English, minority dialects and linguistic profiling, biases against nonstandard speech, and the general perception of the U.S. Midland dialect as "normal American." Hip-hop street talk, IM slang, Pittsburghese, and Gullah and Geechee are sampled, and Bill Labov, the dean of American linguists. Language at times is colloquially rich and some may find it offensive. Date: 2005 Availability: No items available:

6. Do you speak american? down south.   Publication: Princeton Films for the Humanities & Sciences 2005 , VOLUME TWO: DOWN SOUTH. This program follows Robert MacNeil down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Appalachia, Louisiana Cajun country, and the Tex-Mex border to examine Southern dialects and accents and the influences of French and Spanish on American English. Linguist Walt Wolfram, columnist Molly Ivins, pop country singer Cody James, and others talk about regional differences in vernacular, the steady displacement of Southern coastal dialect by inland dialect, the accents of JFK and LBJ, and the Texas border town of El Cenizo, where Spanish is the official language. Recordings of Eudora Welty and Appalachian storyteller Ray Hicks are included, as well as WPA recordings from around 1940. Date: 2005 Availability: No items available:

7. Do you speak American? out west.   Publication: Princeton, NJ: Films for the Humanities & Sciences, 2005 . 57 mins.; color. , VOLUME THREE: OUT WEST: In this program, Robert MacNeil heads to California to take part in meaningful dialogues on Spanglish, Chicano, Ebonics, and "Surfer Dude" before going to Seattle to consider the implications of voice- activation technology. Linguist Carmen Fought, Stanford University's Cliff Nass, screenwriters Amy Heckerling and Winnie Holtzman, and others speak their minds about Spanish in America, why teens create their own language, gay self-empowerment by redefining discriminatory terms, the oo-fronting sound shift, and whether technology will reinforce or weaken racial/regional stereotypes. The teaching of standard English without devaluing or denigrating cultural linguistic differences is addressed. Language at times is colloquially rich and some may find it offensive. Date: 2005 Availability: No items available:

8. If you can't beat 'em, blog 'em   Publication: Princeton, NJ: Films for the Humanities & Sciences, 2004 . 23 mins. ; color. , The rise of the blog as a form of serious news reporting means that conventional journalists must become familiar with the blog format and rethink typical journalistic approaches. This ABC News program examines the blogger “community,” reviews major news stories that were broken by bloggers, and demonstrates ways in which blogging differs from traditional reporting methods. Featuring an interview with a Virginia schoolteacher who created a groundswell of political action with her blog, the video shows how the immediacy and the personal style of blog-writing can have powerful results—so powerful that journalistic accountability is now a contentious blog issue. Date: 2004 Availability: No items available:

9. Making the message : the fight for the Presidency / narrator, Linda Emond ; commentary, Maureen Dowd ... [et al.] ; originally broadcast as a segment on the Discovery channel's television series Discovery spotlight.   Publication: [Princeton, N.J.] : Films for the Humanities & Sciences, 2004 . 1 DVD (88 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in. , This behind-the-scenes account of the 2004 Republican and Democratic conventions examines how presidential candidates build their platforms and generate momentum. Includes interviews with convention chairmen, campaign strategists, members of special interest groups, and journalists. Date: 2004 Availability: No items available:

10. Alice Walker: Everyday Use   Publication: Princeton, NJ Films for the Humanities & Sciences 2004 . 26 mins. ; color. , Maggie sees the old family quilt—an heirloom already promised to her—as something with practical utility as well as tradition. Her educated, social activist sister wants to hang it on the wall as folk art. With whom will their mother side? A study in class differences and the reclamation of Black history, Alice Walker’s short story "Everyday Use" is beautifully realized in this dramatization. (26 minutes) Date: 2004 Availability: No items available: