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1. A century of quilts by Gorman, Laurie A. Publication: [Alexandria, Va.] PBS Home Video 2004 . 1 videocassette(ca.77 min.) sd., sol. 1/2 in. , Closed-captioned VHS | Celebrates the art of quilting by featuring selections from the best 100 American quilts of the 20th century, the stories behind their creation and the quilters as they work. Date: 2004 Availability: No items available:

2. Founding fathers : the men who shaped our nation and changed the world (1)   Publication: MPH Entertainment Inc. for The History Channel 2000 . One DVD : 100 minutes ; color , All rights reserved. Volume One: REBELS WITH A CAUSE The birth of American democracy as attended by an extraordinary cast of characters, drawn from every level of colonial society. They brought to the cause of independence a dazzling array of talents and genius--and an equally noteworthy range of personality flaws and defects. Sam Adams was a rumpled, pugnacious man who failed at a variety of professions, before finding his niche as a revolutionary with a knack for inciting mob violence. John Hancock, a wealthy, aristocratic merchant, was also a known wine-smuggler with a major economic stake in breaking away from Britain. But the unique chemistry of this political "odd couple" would prove pivotal, combining to spark the fires of resentment which until then had been merely smoldering within the colonies. TAKING LIBERTIES In the aftermath of heavy British tax levies and the shock of the Boston Massacre, the situation in the American colonies grew more incendiary. Helping to fan the flames was the eloquent orator Patrick Henry, who rose from backwoods obscurity to marry into money and make the first open "call to arms." Meanwhile, Benjamin Franklin, actually slow to join the colonists' cause, was in London--desperately attempting to patch things up with King George. Across the Atlantic, George Washington, a retired soldier with a spotty military record, maneuvered for command of the rebel forces, while an alcoholic essay writer named Thomas Paine published "Common Sense," one of the period's most famous and inflammatory tracts. Date: 2000 Availability: No items available:

3. Founding fathers : the men who shaped our nation and changed the world (2)   Publication: MPH Entertainment Inc. for The History Channel 2000 . One DVD : 100 minutes ; color , All rights reserved. Volume two: YOU SAY YOU WANT A REVOLUTION By 1776, the rebels would finally make their fateful, final break with Britain. One of those advocating this extreme step was a young Virginia planter named Thomas Jefferson. A misogynist who suffered debilitating migraines, the man who penned the Declaration of Independence wrestled all his life with the contradiction of being a slave-owner himself. On the battlefield, the war did not get off to a promising start. George Washington failed miserably in his first campaigns, while Ben Franklin's own son was arrested for plotting to aid the enemy. But as the revolutionary army gained in experience and confidence--and the French threw their considerable financial support into the fray--the tide slowly but surely began to turn in the rebels' direction. A HEALTHY CONSTITUTION After the final defeat of British forces in Yorktown, the thirteen colonies found themselves in a unique and frightening situation: building a new, democratic nation with no money, few allies and no blueprint of how to proceed. The revolution's savior would turn out to be the shy, studious James Madison, the father of the Constitution. Also vital to the new nation's survival was ensuring good ties with the friends it possessed. Sent to Paris to maintainvital ties with the French. Thomas Jefferson would engage in not one but two scandalous affairs: one with a married woman and one with his slave Sally Hemings. Back in the newly independent America, the revered George Washington would decline the titleof "King" and become the first President of the grand social experiment that came to be the United States of America. Date: 2000 Availability: No items available:

4. Broadway: the American musical v. 1 with English/Chinese subtitles.   Publication: PBS Video 2004 . 120 min. ; color. , BROADWAY: THE AMERICAN MUSICAL is a new six-part documentary series that chronicles the Broadway musical throughout the 20th century and explores the evolution of this uniquely American art form. Episode one: Give My Regards to Broadway (1893-1927) Featured Musicals : "In Dahomey", "Little Johnny Jones", "Show Boat", "The Black Crook", "The Great Ziegfeld", "Ziegfeld Follies" When Florenz Ziegfeld Jr. first hit New York in 1893, the intersection of Broadway and 42nd was nobody's idea of "the crossroads of the world." But by 1913, "'The Ziegfeld Follies' really were an amalgamation of everything that was happening in America, in New York, at that time," says writer Philip Furia. "Flo Ziegfeld was like the Broadway equivalent of the melting pot itself." Ziegfeld's story introduces many of the era's key figures: Irving Berlin, a Russian immigrant who became the voice of assimilated America; entertainers like Jewish comedienne Fanny Brice and African American Bert Williams, who became America's first "crossover" artists; and the brash Irish American George M. Cohan, whose song-and-dance routines embodied the energy of Broadway. This is also the story of the onset of World War I and the Red Summer of 1919, when labor unrest swept the nation -- and Broadway. The episode culminates in Ziegfeld's 1927 production of Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II's far-sighted masterpiece, "Show Boat." With the Great Depression, the Ziegfeld era became a memory. Episode two: Syncopated City (1919-1933) Featured Musicals "A connecticut Yankee", "George White Scandals" ,"Good News", "Lady Be, Good!", "Runnin' Wild", "Sally", "shuffle Along", "The Garrick Gaieties", "Tip-Toes" Gossip columnist Walter Winchell gave Broadway a nickname that becomes synonymous with all of New York: "It is the Big Apple, the goal of all ambitions, the pot of gold at the end of a drab and somewhat colorless rainbow." With the advent of Prohibition and the Jazz Age, America convulsed with energy and change, and nowhere was the riotous mix of classes and cultures more dramatically on display than Broadway. "There was this period in which everybody was leaping across borders and boundaries," says director/producer George C. Wolfe. "There was this incredible cross-fertilization, cultural appropriation." While brash American women flapped their way to newfound freedoms, heroines of Broadway like Marilyn Miller became a testament to pluck and luck. It was the age of "Whoopee" and the "Charleston," "Runnin' Wild" and the "George White Scandals." In 1921, a jazz show like no other arrived: "Shuffle Along," which featured a rich, rousing score by Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake, reopening Broadway's doors to black artists. Unique talents like the Marx Brothers and Al Jolson -- a Jewish immigrant and Prohibition's biggest star -- rocketed to stardom. The Gershwin brothers, the minstrels of the Jazz Age, brought a "Fascinating Rhythm" to an entire nation. Innovative songwriting teams like Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart ignited a new age of bright melodies and clever lyrics with the massive hit "Manhattan." But as the Roaring Twenties came to a close, Broadway's Jazz Age suffered the one-two punch of the "talking picture" and the stock market crash, triggering a massive talent exodus to Hollywood and putting an end to Broadway's feverish expansion. Date: 2004 Availability: No items available:

5. Broadway: the American musical v. 2 with English/Chinese subtitles   Publication: PBS Video 2004 , BROADWAY: THE AMERICAN MUSICAL is a new six-part documentary series that chronicles the Broadway musical throughout the 20th century and explores the evolution of this uniquely American art form. Episode 3: I Got Plenty O'Nuttin' (1929-1942) Featured Musicals are "Americana", "anything Goes", "As Thousands Cheer", "Gay Divorce" "Girl Crazy", "Of Thee I sing", "Pal Joey", "Paris", "Porgy and Bess", "The Cradle Will Rock", "This is the Army" The Great Depression proved to be a dynamic period of creative growth on Broadway, and a dichotomy in the musical theater emerged. Productions like Cole Porter's "Anything Goes" offered glamour and high times as an escape, while others -- such as "Of Thee I Sing," which satirized the American political system, and the remarkable WPA production of "The Cradle Will Rock," about a steel strike -- dealt directly with the era's social and political concerns. When Bing Crosby recorded "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime," the doleful Broadway ballad took the hit parade by surprise. "This song spoke to the hearts, and to the minds, and to the emotions and thoughts, of everybody who lived during that depression," says lyricist Yip Harburg's son, Ernie. Rodgers and Hart created a string of new shows, including the sexually frank "Pal Joey," a genuine departure that starred newcomer Gene Kelly. In the gloom of the depression, Porter offered Broadway audiences such unforgettable songs as "You're the Top," which served as an effervescent tonic to a weary nation. In 1935, George Gershwin created his epic masterpiece, "Porgy and Bess," bringing a hybrid style of folk opera to Broadway. The onset of World War II galvanized the country and America's troubadour, Irving Berlin, rallied the troops with "This Is the Army." Episode 4: Oh, What a Beautiful Morning (1943-1960) Featured Musicals are "annie Get Your Gun", "Carousel", "Guys and Dolls", "Kiss Me, Kate", "My Fair Lady", "Oklahoma!","On the Town", "Sound of Music", "South Pacific" The new partnership of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II changed the face of Broadway forever, beginning with the record-breaking "Oklahoma!" in 1943, featuring a landmark ballet by Agnes de Mille. "Carousel" and "South Pacific" then set the standard for decades to come by pioneering a musical where story is all-important. For challenging the country to confront its deep-seated racial bigotry, "South Pacific" won the Pulitzer Prize. In "On the Town," an exuberant team of novices -- Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden, Adolph Green, and Jerome Robbins -- captured the energy, humor, and pathos of New York City during World War II. Irving Berlin triumphed again with "Annie Get Your Gun," featuring Ethel Merman and the unofficial anthem of the American musical theater, "There's No Business Like Show Business." In shows like "Guys and Dolls," "My Fair Lady," and "Kiss Me, Kate," sophisticated adaptations of literary material prevailed. "Cole Porter led the way in writing adult songs about love and sex," says theater historian Robert Kimball. "He defied the censors. He, probably more than any other songwriter in this century, made it possible for the openness that we have in all popular music." In 1956, Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe triumphed with "My Fair Lady," featuring an 18-year-old Julie Andrews. TV's THE ED SULLIVAN SHOW became the most important showcase for Broadway musicals. Yet with the death of Oscar Hammerstein II soon after the premiere of "The Sound of Music" in 1959, the curtain began to lower on a golden age. Date: 2004 Availability: No items available:

6. Broadway: the American musical v. 3, with English/Chinese subtitles.   Publication: PBS Video 2004 , BROADWAY: THE AMERICAN MUSICAL is a new six-part documentary series that chronicles the Broadway musical throughout the 20th century and explores the evolution of this uniquely American art form. Episode 5: Tradition (1957-1979) Featured musicals are "A Chorus Line", "Cabaret", "Chicago","Company", "Fiddler on the Roof", "Hair", "Hello, Dolly!", ""Pacific Overtures","Sweeney Todd", "The Pajama Game", "West Side Story" West Side Story" not only brought untraditional subject matter to the musical stage, it ushered in a new breed of director/choreographer who insisted on performers who could dance, sing and act. But by the time Jerome Robbins' last original musical, "Fiddler on the Roof," closed after a record run of 3,242 performances in 1972, the world of Broadway had changed forever. Rock 'n' roll, civil rights, and the Vietnam War ushered in new talents, many trained by the retiring masters, taking musical theater in daring new directions with innovative productions like "Hair," the first Broadway musical with an entire score of rock music. The adult narrative of Stephen Sondheim's "Company" plunged the musical into a new era. Hal Prince's conceptual staging showcased John Kander and Fred Ebb's dynamic score for "Cabaret." Bob Fosse captured a sexuality and cynicism ahead of its time with "Chicago," but it was director/choreographer Michael Bennett who spearheaded the biggest blockbuster of all -- "A Chorus Line." "It totally changed the musical theater," says Shubert Organization chairman Gerald Schoenfeld. "It was a catalyst for the improvement of this area, and of course this area is now the most desirable area in New York." With Sondheim's "Sweeney Todd," the Broadway musical reached unexpected new heights in style and material with a tale of slaughter and cannibalism set in 19th-century London. By the end of the 1970s, Broadway became the centerpiece of a remarkably successful public relations campaign that would lure tourists to New York for years to come. Episode 6: Putting it together Featured Musicals are "42nd Street", "Cats", "La Cage aux Folles", "Rent", "Sunday in the Park with George", "The Lion King", "The Producers", "Wicked" Legendary as the "Abominable Showman," notorious producer David Merrick reconquered Broadway in 1980 with a smash adaptation of the movie musical "42nd Street." But soon the biggest hits were arriving from an unexpected source -- London. Producer Cameron Mackintosh redefined the business of show business as "Cats," "Les Miserables," "The Phantom of the Opera," and "Miss Saigon" became international blockbusters. Sondheim's "Sunday in the Park with George" defied categorization while Jerry Herman's crowd-pleasing "La Cage aux Folles" had two men sing a love song to each other for the first time on the stage -- a breakthrough soon overshadowed by the decimation of Broadway by AIDS. Yet with Julie Taymor's triumphant reimagining of "The Lion King," Disney led an astonishing resurrection of 42nd Street. Composer Jonathan Larson scored a bittersweet victory with the rock-flavored "Rent," and the old-style musical was reborn in Mel Brooks' "The Producers," which became the first must-see musical comedy in decades, despite a ticket price of $480 for each VIP seat. After 9/11, Broadway -- like the rest of America -- emerged from the darkness. Broadway's corporate dominance continues to grow, as evidenced by new shows such as "Wicked," the biggest hit of the 2003-04 season, with 10 Tony nods. Date: 2004 Availability: No items available:

7. Echoes from the White House: a celebration of the bicentennial of America's mansion   Publication: PBS 2001 . 60 mins. ; color. , Hosted by Martin Sheen, this documentary celebrates the 200th anniversary of the White House with a look at the stories, both public and private, that have unfolded within its walls. The program reincarnates two centuries of power-plays, tragedies, crises, celebrations and victories through the words of those involved. Date: 2001 Availability: No items available:

8. The presidents: the lives and legacies of the 43 leaders of the United States.   Publication: A&E Television Network 2005 . 3 V. ( Volume one: 135 mins., Volume two: 135 mins., Volume three: 90 mins.) ; color/B&W , This series traces the history of America's highest office from the Revolution to the 2004 campaign. The office is one of the hallmarks of the American experiment, open to any native-born citizen over the age of 35. The men who have inhabited it have been heroes and villains, visionaries and scoundrels, towering figures and seeming afterthoughts. VOLUME ONE examines the first 76 of the office, from George Washington to Abraham Lincoln (1789-1865). VOLUME TWO surveys the next 80 years of the office, from Andrew Johnson to Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1865-1945). VOLUME THREE examines the most recent 60 years of the office from Harry Truman to George W. Bush (1945-Present). Date: 2005 Availability: No items available:

9. Abraham and Mary Lincoln :   Publication: [United States] : WGBH Educational Foundation : | Distributed by PBS Home Video, 2001 . 3 videocassettes of 3 (360 min.) : | Copyright: no reg. , Special features include: interviews with the producer and cinematographer, audio descriptions, audio navigation, three-part featurette, interactive map, videos interview of historians, timelines, essays, photo galleries, and teacher's guide. | Videocassette 1. This film begins in 1882 when Mary Todd Lincoln is an old woman living near Springfield, Illinois. It backtracts to tell the story of the couple's childhoods his in a remote backwoods log cabin, hers in a wealthy Kentucky home. And it describes their courtship. Mary sets her heart on the raw, socially awkward Lincoln, saying later. “ He’ll be president of the United States on day. If I had not thought so I never would have married him. “ Their partnership is both tempestuous and passionate. She has a temper, and he suffers bouts of depression. But they share a powerful political ambition that sends Lincoln to the House of Representatives and later, with the country splitting apart over slavery, propels him to run for president. On election night, when the results finally come in, Lincoln goes home and tells his wife, “Mary, Mary, we are elected” | Videcassette 2: When the Lincolns arrive in Washington in 1861, the country is breaking apart. The country's president-elect is unknown, untested, and mistrusted. His wife, the daughter of a Southern slave owner, is suspected of being a Confederate sympathizer, As Lincoln leads a confused and frightened people through the most terrible conflict in their history, disaster strikes his own home: Willie Lincoln -- the child Mary says will be the hope and stay of her old age – dies. Mary, though tormented by her grief, visits wounded soldiers and helps slaves who have made their way to the North. Losing her grip on sanity, she also turns to spiritualists for comfort. Her husband, bowed down with sorrow, never loses sight of the tragedy consuming the nation. With the war going badly in the east, enlistments drying up, and morale low, Lincoln takes a step that changes the country forever and in ding so he changes himself. On January 1, 1863 the sixteenth president issues the Emancipation Proclamation liberating millions of Americans from bondage. The Move turns the Civil War from a conflict over union into a struggle for freedom. 1/2 in. Date: 2001 Availability: No items available:

10. Iron-Jawed Angels   Publication: Home Box Office 2004 . 124 min. ; color. , Oscar-winner Hilary Swank stars in a fresh and contemporary look at a pivotal event in American history, telling the true story of how a pair of defiant and brilliant young activists took the women's suffrage movement by storm, putting their lives at risk to help American women win the right to vote. Date: 2004 Availability: No items available:

11. Broadway's best at pops by Cosel, Bill Publication: 2007 WGBH . 76 mins. ; color. , Featuring three of the renowned conductors of the Boston Pops Orchestra--Arthur Fiedler, John Williams, and Keith Lockhart--this program celebrates the Pops' collaborations with all-star guest performers from Broadway. These show-stopping performances, some of which haven t been seen for over three decades, will make you want to jump up and sing along. Broadway s Best at Pops also features interviews with legends of the Great White Way, treating you to a walk down the memory lane called Broadway that you will not soon forget. Performances include: - Ethel Merman - Medley including Everything's Coming Up Roses from Gypsy - Ray Bolger - Once in Love with Amy from Where's Charley? - Kristin Chenoweth - Glitter and Be Gay from Candide - Pearl Bailey - Hello, Dolly from Hello, Dolly! - Bonnie and John Raitt - Hey There from Pajama Game - Bernadette Peters - Broadway Baby from Follies - Tommy Tune - Tap Your Troubles Away from Mack & Mabel - Carol Channing - Diamonds Are A Girl's Best Friend from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes - Gregory Hines - Rhythm Is My Business - And many more! Availability: No items available:

12. The Civil War : a film by Ken Burns   Publication: PBS 1990 . 4 discs (9 programs) , This video documentary program, consisting of nine episodes of the civil war, was produced by the public Broadcasting system (PBS). The program begins with the bitter regional conflict between Union and States' rights and ends with the struggle over the meaning of freedom in America. | Episode One: The Cause (1861). Beginning with a searing indictment of slavery, this first episode dramatically evokes the causes of the war, from the Cotton Kingdom of the South to the northern abolitionists who opposed it. Here are the burning questions of Union and States’ rights, John Brown at Harper’s Ferry, the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860, the firing on Fort Sumter and the jubilant rush to arms on both sides. Along the way the series’ major figures are introduced: Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant and a host of lesser-known but equally vivid characters. The episode comes to a climax with the disastrous Union defeat at Manassas, Virginia, where both sides now learn it is to be a very long war. | Episode Two: A Very Bloody Affairs(1862). 1862 saw the birth of modern warfare and the transformation of Lincoln’s war to preserve the Union into a war to emancipate the slaves. Episode Two begins with the political infighting that threatened to swamp Lincoln’s administration and then follows Union General George McClellan’s ill-fated campaign on the Virginia Peninsula, where his huge army meets a smaller but infinitely more resourceful Confederate force. During this episode we witness the battle of ironclad ships, partake of camp life, and watch slavery begin to crumble. We meet Ulysses S. Grant, whose exploits come to a bloody climax at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee. The episode ends with rumors of Europe’s readiness to recognize the Confederacy. | Episode Three: Forever Free (1862). This episode charts the dramatic events that led to Lincoln’s decision to set the slaves free. Convinced by July 1862 that emancipation was now morally and militarily crucial to the future of the Union, Lincoln must wait for a victory to issue his proclamation. But as the year wears on there are no Union victories to be had, thanks to the brilliance of Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee. The episode comes to a climax in September 1862 with Lee’s invasion of Maryland. On the banks of Antietam Creek, the bloodiest day of the war takes place, followed shortly by the brightest: the emancipation of the slaves. | Episode Four: Simply Murder (1863). The nightmarish Union disaster at Fredericksburg comes to two climaxes that spring: at Chancellorsville in May, where Lee wins his most brilliant victory but loses Stonewall Jackson; and at Vicksburg, where Grant’s attempts to take the city by siege are stopped. During the episode we learn of fierce Northern opposition to Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, the miseries of regimental life and the increasing desperation of the Confederate homefront. As the episode ends, Lee decides to invade the North again to draw Grant’s forces away from Vicksburg. | Episode Five: The Universe of Battle (1863). This episode opens with a dramatic account of the turning point of war: the Battle of Gettysburg, the greatest ever fought in the Western Hemisphere. For three days 150,000 men will fight to the death in the Pennsylvania countryside, culminating in Pickett’s legendary charge. This extended episode then goes on to chronicle the fall of Vicksburg, the New York draft riots, the first use of black troops, and the western battles at Chickamauga, Georgia and Chattanooga, Tennessee. The episode closes with the dedication of a new Union cemetery at Gettysburg in November, where Abraham Lincoln struggles to put into words what is happening to his people. | Episode Six: Valley of the Shadow of Death (1864). Episode six begins with a biographical comparison of Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee and then chronicles the extraordinary series of battles that pitted the two generals against each other from the wilderness to Petersburg in Virginia. In 30 days, the two armies lose more men than both sides have lost in three years of war. With Grant and Lee finally deadlocked at Petersburg, we visit the ghastly hospitals north and south and follow General Sherman’s Atlanta campaign through the mountains of north Georgia. As the horrendous casualty lists increase, Lincoln’s chances for re-election begin to dim, and with them the possibility of Union victory. | Episode Seven: Most Hallowed Ground (1864).The episode begins with the presidential election of 1864 that sets Abraham Lincoln against his old commanding general, George McClellan. The stakes are nothing less than the survival of the Union itself: with Grant and Sherman stalled at Petersburg and Atlanta, opinion in the North has turned strongly against the war. But 11th-hour victories at Mobile Bay, Atlanta, and the Shenandoah Valley tilt the election to Lincoln and the Confederacy’s last hope for independence dies. In an ironic twist, poignantly typical of the Civil War, Lee’s Arlington mansion is turned into a Union military hospital and the estate becomes Arlington National Cemetery, the Union’s most hallowed ground. | Episode Eight: War is All Hell (1865).The episode begins with William Tecumseh Sherman’s brilliant march to the sea, which brings the war to the heart of Georgia and the Carolinas and spells the end of the Confederacy. In March, following Lincoln’s second inauguration, first Petersburg and then Richmond finally fall to Grant’s army. Lee’s tattered Army of Northern Virginia flees westward towards a tiny crossroads town called Appomattox Court House. There the dramatic and deeply moving surrender of Lee to Grant takes place. The episode ends in Washington where John Wilkes Booth begins to dream of vengeance for the South. | Episode Nine: The Better Angels of Our Nature (1865).This extraordinary final episode of The Civil War begins in the bittersweet aftermath of Lee’s surrender and then goes on to narrate the horrendous events of five days later when, on April 14, Lincoln is assassinated. After chronicling Lincoln’s poignant funeral, the series recounts the final days of the war, the capture of John Wilkes Booth and the fates of the Civil War’s major protagonists. The episode then considers the consequences and meaning of a war that transformed the country from a collection of states to the nation we are today. Date: 1990 Availability: No items available:

13. A century of quilts: America in cloth   Publication: PBS 2001 . 77 mins. color. , This documentary celebrates the art of quilting by featuring selections from the best 100 American quilts of the 20th century, the stories behind their creation and the quilters as they work. The program travels across America to capture the artists at work in their studios and homes and tells the stories behind the creation of these treasures. Date: 2001 Availability: No items available:

14. Inside the meltdown / Michael Kirk; Jim Gilmore; Mike Wiser; Peter Rhodes; Will Lyman;   Publication: [S.l.] : PBS Video, 2009 . 1 disc (60 mins). sd. col. , FRONTLINE investigates the causes of the worst economic crisis in 70 years and how the government responded. The film chronicles the inside stories of the Bear Stearns deal, Lehman Brothers' collapse, the propping up of insurance giant AIG, and the $700 billion bailout. Inside the Meltdown examines what Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke didn't see, couldn't stop and haven't been able to fix. | 1. First tremors -- 2. The deal to save Bear Stearns -- 3. Next crisis: Fanny Mae, Freddie Mac -- 4. Let Lehman fail -- 5. As markets start crashing... -- 6. The contagion goes global. Date: 2009 Availability: No items available:

15. Pioneer life in revolutionary America / Video Dialog Inc.; New Dimension Media, Inc.   Publication: Jacksonville, IL : New Dimension Media, 1997. . 1 videodisc : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in. , Using historical period locations, sets, costumes, and language reflecting the American Colonial era, this series explores the events and social history that led to the formation of the United States. Narration unifies the dramatic sequences. The lifestyle of the first wave of settlers to cross the Appalachian Mountains is recreated, describing the importance of this westward-moving frontier to American values. Availability: No items available:

16. 10 days that unexpectedly changed America / Joe Berlinger; R J Cutler; Kate Davis; David Heilbroner; Michael Epstein; Rob Epstein; Jeffrey Friedman; Barak Goodman; John Maggio; Rory Kennedy; James Moll; Bruce Sinofsky; Marco Williams; Martin Sheen; Jeffrey Wright; Joe Morton; Campbell Scott; Hector Elizondo; Terry Kinney; All Productions.; @Radical.media (Firm); History Channel (Television network); A & E Home Video (Firm); New Video Group. by Berlinger, Joe Publication: [Burlington, VT] : A & E Home Video ; New York : Distributed by New Video, ©2006. 2006 . 3 videodiscs (ca. 460 min.) : sd., col. and b&w ; 4 3/4 in. , "Featuring the work of acclaimed directors: Joe Berlinger, R.J. Cutler, Kate Davis & David Heilbroner, Michael Epstein, Rob Epstein & Jeffrey Friedman, Barak Goodman & John Maggio, Rory Kennedy, James Moll, Bruce Sinofsky, Marco Williams." | Disc 1. Massacre at Mystic ; Shays' Rebellion: America's first civil war ; Gold rush ; Antietam -- Disc 2. The Homestead strike ; Murder at the fair: the assassination of President McKinley ; Scopes: the battle over Americ's soul -- Disc 3. Einstein's letter ; When America was rocked ; Freedom summer. | Acclaimed documentary filmmakers offer a fresh, compelling look at 10 pivotal moments in American history and their often unforeseen repercussions. Date: 2006 Availability: No items available:

17. Broadway: the American musical v. 1 with English/Chinese subtitles.   Publication: PBS Video 2004 . 120 min. ; color. , BROADWAY: THE AMERICAN MUSICAL is a new six-part documentary series that chronicles the Broadway musical throughout the 20th century and explores the evolution of this uniquely American art form. Episode one: Give My Regards to Broadway (1893-1927) Featured Musicals : "In Dahomey", "Little Johnny Jones", "Show Boat", "The Black Crook", "The Great Ziegfeld", "Ziegfeld Follies" When Florenz Ziegfeld Jr. first hit New York in 1893, the intersection of Broadway and 42nd was nobody's idea of "the crossroads of the world." But by 1913, "'The Ziegfeld Follies' really were an amalgamation of everything that was happening in America, in New York, at that time," says writer Philip Furia. "Flo Ziegfeld was like the Broadway equivalent of the melting pot itself." Ziegfeld's story introduces many of the era's key figures: Irving Berlin, a Russian immigrant who became the voice of assimilated America; entertainers like Jewish comedienne Fanny Brice and African American Bert Williams, who became America's first "crossover" artists; and the brash Irish American George M. Cohan, whose song-and-dance routines embodied the energy of Broadway. This is also the story of the onset of World War I and the Red Summer of 1919, when labor unrest swept the nation -- and Broadway. The episode culminates in Ziegfeld's 1927 production of Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II's far-sighted masterpiece, "Show Boat." With the Great Depression, the Ziegfeld era became a memory. Episode two: Syncopated City (1919-1933) Featured Musicals "A connecticut Yankee", "George White Scandals" ,"Good News", "Lady Be, Good!", "Runnin' Wild", "Sally", "shuffle Along", "The Garrick Gaieties", "Tip-Toes" Gossip columnist Walter Winchell gave Broadway a nickname that becomes synonymous with all of New York: "It is the Big Apple, the goal of all ambitions, the pot of gold at the end of a drab and somewhat colorless rainbow." With the advent of Prohibition and the Jazz Age, America convulsed with energy and change, and nowhere was the riotous mix of classes and cultures more dramatically on display than Broadway. "There was this period in which everybody was leaping across borders and boundaries," says director/producer George C. Wolfe. "There was this incredible cross-fertilization, cultural appropriation." While brash American women flapped their way to newfound freedoms, heroines of Broadway like Marilyn Miller became a testament to pluck and luck. It was the age of "Whoopee" and the "Charleston," "Runnin' Wild" and the "George White Scandals." In 1921, a jazz show like no other arrived: "Shuffle Along," which featured a rich, rousing score by Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake, reopening Broadway's doors to black artists. Unique talents like the Marx Brothers and Al Jolson -- a Jewish immigrant and Prohibition's biggest star -- rocketed to stardom. The Gershwin brothers, the minstrels of the Jazz Age, brought a "Fascinating Rhythm" to an entire nation. Innovative songwriting teams like Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart ignited a new age of bright melodies and clever lyrics with the massive hit "Manhattan." But as the Roaring Twenties came to a close, Broadway's Jazz Age suffered the one-two punch of the "talking picture" and the stock market crash, triggering a massive talent exodus to Hollywood and putting an end to Broadway's feverish expansion. Date: 2004 Availability: No items available:

18. Broadway: the American musical v. 2 with English/Chinese subtitles   Publication: PBS Video 2004 , BROADWAY: THE AMERICAN MUSICAL is a new six-part documentary series that chronicles the Broadway musical throughout the 20th century and explores the evolution of this uniquely American art form. Episode 3: I Got Plenty O'Nuttin' (1929-1942) Featured Musicals are "Americana", "anything Goes", "As Thousands Cheer", "Gay Divorce" "Girl Crazy", "Of Thee I sing", "Pal Joey", "Paris", "Porgy and Bess", "The Cradle Will Rock", "This is the Army" The Great Depression proved to be a dynamic period of creative growth on Broadway, and a dichotomy in the musical theater emerged. Productions like Cole Porter's "Anything Goes" offered glamour and high times as an escape, while others -- such as "Of Thee I Sing," which satirized the American political system, and the remarkable WPA production of "The Cradle Will Rock," about a steel strike -- dealt directly with the era's social and political concerns. When Bing Crosby recorded "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime," the doleful Broadway ballad took the hit parade by surprise. "This song spoke to the hearts, and to the minds, and to the emotions and thoughts, of everybody who lived during that depression," says lyricist Yip Harburg's son, Ernie. Rodgers and Hart created a string of new shows, including the sexually frank "Pal Joey," a genuine departure that starred newcomer Gene Kelly. In the gloom of the depression, Porter offered Broadway audiences such unforgettable songs as "You're the Top," which served as an effervescent tonic to a weary nation. In 1935, George Gershwin created his epic masterpiece, "Porgy and Bess," bringing a hybrid style of folk opera to Broadway. The onset of World War II galvanized the country and America's troubadour, Irving Berlin, rallied the troops with "This Is the Army." Episode 4: Oh, What a Beautiful Morning (1943-1960) Featured Musicals are "annie Get Your Gun", "Carousel", "Guys and Dolls", "Kiss Me, Kate", "My Fair Lady", "Oklahoma!","On the Town", "Sound of Music", "South Pacific" The new partnership of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II changed the face of Broadway forever, beginning with the record-breaking "Oklahoma!" in 1943, featuring a landmark ballet by Agnes de Mille. "Carousel" and "South Pacific" then set the standard for decades to come by pioneering a musical where story is all-important. For challenging the country to confront its deep-seated racial bigotry, "South Pacific" won the Pulitzer Prize. In "On the Town," an exuberant team of novices -- Leonard Bernstein, Betty Comden, Adolph Green, and Jerome Robbins -- captured the energy, humor, and pathos of New York City during World War II. Irving Berlin triumphed again with "Annie Get Your Gun," featuring Ethel Merman and the unofficial anthem of the American musical theater, "There's No Business Like Show Business." In shows like "Guys and Dolls," "My Fair Lady," and "Kiss Me, Kate," sophisticated adaptations of literary material prevailed. "Cole Porter led the way in writing adult songs about love and sex," says theater historian Robert Kimball. "He defied the censors. He, probably more than any other songwriter in this century, made it possible for the openness that we have in all popular music." In 1956, Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe triumphed with "My Fair Lady," featuring an 18-year-old Julie Andrews. TV's THE ED SULLIVAN SHOW became the most important showcase for Broadway musicals. Yet with the death of Oscar Hammerstein II soon after the premiere of "The Sound of Music" in 1959, the curtain began to lower on a golden age. Date: 2004 Availability: No items available:

19. Broadway: the American musical v. 3, with English/Chinese subtitles.   Publication: PBS Video 2004 , BROADWAY: THE AMERICAN MUSICAL is a new six-part documentary series that chronicles the Broadway musical throughout the 20th century and explores the evolution of this uniquely American art form. Episode 5: Tradition (1957-1979) Featured musicals are "A Chorus Line", "Cabaret", "Chicago","Company", "Fiddler on the Roof", "Hair", "Hello, Dolly!", ""Pacific Overtures","Sweeney Todd", "The Pajama Game", "West Side Story" West Side Story" not only brought untraditional subject matter to the musical stage, it ushered in a new breed of director/choreographer who insisted on performers who could dance, sing and act. But by the time Jerome Robbins' last original musical, "Fiddler on the Roof," closed after a record run of 3,242 performances in 1972, the world of Broadway had changed forever. Rock 'n' roll, civil rights, and the Vietnam War ushered in new talents, many trained by the retiring masters, taking musical theater in daring new directions with innovative productions like "Hair," the first Broadway musical with an entire score of rock music. The adult narrative of Stephen Sondheim's "Company" plunged the musical into a new era. Hal Prince's conceptual staging showcased John Kander and Fred Ebb's dynamic score for "Cabaret." Bob Fosse captured a sexuality and cynicism ahead of its time with "Chicago," but it was director/choreographer Michael Bennett who spearheaded the biggest blockbuster of all -- "A Chorus Line." "It totally changed the musical theater," says Shubert Organization chairman Gerald Schoenfeld. "It was a catalyst for the improvement of this area, and of course this area is now the most desirable area in New York." With Sondheim's "Sweeney Todd," the Broadway musical reached unexpected new heights in style and material with a tale of slaughter and cannibalism set in 19th-century London. By the end of the 1970s, Broadway became the centerpiece of a remarkably successful public relations campaign that would lure tourists to New York for years to come. Episode 6: Putting it together Featured Musicals are "42nd Street", "Cats", "La Cage aux Folles", "Rent", "Sunday in the Park with George", "The Lion King", "The Producers", "Wicked" Legendary as the "Abominable Showman," notorious producer David Merrick reconquered Broadway in 1980 with a smash adaptation of the movie musical "42nd Street." But soon the biggest hits were arriving from an unexpected source -- London. Producer Cameron Mackintosh redefined the business of show business as "Cats," "Les Miserables," "The Phantom of the Opera," and "Miss Saigon" became international blockbusters. Sondheim's "Sunday in the Park with George" defied categorization while Jerry Herman's crowd-pleasing "La Cage aux Folles" had two men sing a love song to each other for the first time on the stage -- a breakthrough soon overshadowed by the decimation of Broadway by AIDS. Yet with Julie Taymor's triumphant reimagining of "The Lion King," Disney led an astonishing resurrection of 42nd Street. Composer Jonathan Larson scored a bittersweet victory with the rock-flavored "Rent," and the old-style musical was reborn in Mel Brooks' "The Producers," which became the first must-see musical comedy in decades, despite a ticket price of $480 for each VIP seat. After 9/11, Broadway -- like the rest of America -- emerged from the darkness. Broadway's corporate dominance continues to grow, as evidenced by new shows such as "Wicked," the biggest hit of the 2003-04 season, with 10 Tony nods. Date: 2004 Availability: No items available:

20. United States expansion by Fabian, Rhonda Publication: Wynnewood, PA : Schlessinger Media, 2004, ©1996. . 1 videodisc (25 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in. + teacher's guide [6] p. , Irene Bedard, the recognized voice of Disney's Pocahontas, narrates this journey through American history created especially for children. This program covers the story of the Lewis & Clark Expedition and Sacajawea, follows the life of a child in a pioneer family, "America the Beautiful," the forced relocation of Native Americans from their homelands, the story of John Henry and the history of Mount Rushmore. Availability: No items available: