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1. Red badge of courage   Publication: Discovery Communications, Inc. 1998 . 27 min. ; color & b/w , Red Badge of Courage A century ago a 22-year-old named Stephen Crane wrote The Red Badge of Courage, one of the greatest books ever about the Civil War. This video examines Crane's mind and analyzes the classic tale of a young man in the midst of a horrifying, bloody conflict. Crane explores the fear every young man faces: Does he have the courage to face the terrors that a man must face, or is he at heart a coward? By bringing to light the fears young people have when moving out into a cold world, Crane's story is able to touch each new generation. Date: 1998 Availability: No items available:

2. Parker Adderson, philosopher   Publication: Learning in Focus, Inc. 1975 . 39 mins. ; color , PARKER ADDERSON, PHILOSOPHER is the story of a union Army Spy, Parker Adderson, who is captured being enemy lines at the end of the Civil War. He is sympathetic towards a young lieutenant, but is at odds with the Confederate general. In a struggle before his execution, the lieutenant is killed and the general is wounded. The general dies as the spy is shot. Date: 1975 Availability: No items available:

3. The blue hotel   Publication: Learning in Focus, Inc. 1975 . 55 mins. ; color , The time is the 1880's. A young Swede arrives at the hotel of a moody, frontier Nebraska town. He anticipates the wild west of the dime novels and parlays that anticipation into his own death. Unable to relate to his new environment, the Swede is antagonistic to his hotelkeeper and fellow guests. A fateful card game results in accusations of cheating, a fight, and a violent climax. Original story by Stephen Crane. (American Short Story Series) Date: 1975 Availability: No items available:

4. Rappaccini's daughter   Publication: Learning in Focus, Inc 1980 . 57 mins. ; color , Kristoffer Tabori and Kathleen Beller bring to life Nathaniel Hawthorne's haunting tale of 18th century Italy and a young man who risks everything to woo a beautiful, forbidden girl.(American Short Story Series) Date: 1980 Availability: No items available:

5. The jolly corner by Barron, Arthur Publication: Learning in Focus, Inc. 1976 . 43 mins. ; color , THE JOLLY CORNER is the story of Spencer Brydon, who has returned to the United States after an absence of 35 years, during which time he missed both the fighting in the Civil War and America's dynamic economic birth. Brydon wonders if he would have been different if he had remained in America. In an effort to find out, he painfully reconstructs the secrets of his past and the potentials of an alien yet appealing future. A Henry James short story forms the basis for this television play by Arthur Barron. (American Short Story Series) Date: 1976 Availability: No items available:

6. Golden Honeymoon   Publication: Learning in Focus, Inc. 1980 . 52 mins. ; color , Teresa Wright and James Whitmore star in Ring Lardner's comedy about an elderly couple who take a winter vacation in Florida in the 1920's and discover that 50 years of marriage do not preclude the stirring of old jealousies--and the chance to learn from them. (American Short Story Series) Date: 1980 Availability: No items available:

7. The displaced person   Publication: Learning in Focus, Inc. 1977 . 58 mins. ; color , A Polish family, displaced after World War II, comes to live and work on a Southern farm. The workers on the farm see their positions threatened, and personal frictions eventually end in the death of the Polish man, the displacement of the workers from the land and the loss of the farm by the owner. Original story by Flannery O'Connor. (American Short Story Series) Date: 1977 Availability: No items available:

8. The Greatest man in the world   Publication: Learning in Focus, Inc. 1980 . 51 mins. ; color , This is the wry story by James Thurber of an incorrigible lout who becomes the first person to make a solo, non-stop flight around the world -- to the delight of cynical newsmen and the dismy of officials who try desperately to make a socially acceptable hero of him. Brad Davis, Howard DaSilva, Carol Kane, John McMartin star. (American Short Story Series) Date: 1980 Availability: No items available:

9. The music school   Publication: Learning in Focus, Inc. 1974 . 30 mins. ; color , In this adaptation of the story by John Updike, the central character, a writer, dwells on the culture around him. The implications of religion and technology, contemporary violence and social change all emerge in vivid images while the writer struggles, during a 24-hour period, to find a focus in his life. (American Short Story Series) Date: 1974 Availability: No items available:

10. Almos' a man   Publication: Learning in Focus, Inc. 1975 . 39 mins. ; color , Features ROOTS Star, Le Var Burton, as David, a black teenager, searches for manhood in the Deep South farm country of the 1930's. He equates manhood with the owning of a gun. In the process of trying out his new possession, he shoots the mule which is in his care. He confesses his act, is demeaned by his father and is bondaged by the ladowner to pay for the mule. The young man rebels, takes his gun and escapes on a passing train--still hoping to find his manhood and a new life. Richard Wright's short story is the basis for Leslie Lee's play. (American Short Story Series) Date: 1975 Availability: No items available:

11. Mark Twain by Twain, Mark, 1835-1910 Publication: [Alexandria, Va.?] : PBS Home Video ; Burbank, CA : Warner Home Video 2001 . 2 VHS (part 1-110 mins. part 2-103 mins.) : color ; 1/2 in. , Samuel Clemens rose from a hardscrabble boyhood in the backwoods of Missouri to become, as Mark Twain, America's best-known and best-loved author. Considered in his time as the funniest man on earth, Twain was also an unflinching critic of human nature who used his humor to attack hypocrisy, greed and racism. He created some of the world's most memorable characters as well as its most quoted sayings. And, in his often-misunderstood novel Huckleberry Finn, he brought forth a masterpiece that Ernest Hemingway called the true beginning of American literature. This remarkable film tells the story of Twain's extraordinary life--full of rollicking adventure, stupendous success and crushing defeat, hilarious comedy and almost unbearable tragedy. With fascinating interviews of Hal Holbrook, Arthur Miller, William Styron and many others, the story is told primarily through the words of Twain himself, so viewers of all ages can be personally introduced to this compelling yet contradictory genius, who said with some justification, "I am not an American, I am the American." Date: 2001 Availability: No items available:

12. American passages : 1. Native voices. 2. Exploring borderlands   Publication: Oregon Public Broadcasting From Annenberg/CPB 2002 . 60 min. , Series description: American Passages is a video series that looks at American literature, connecting major writers to those less often taught. The series takes an expanded view of American literary movements, bringing in a diversity of voices and tracing the continuity among them. The 16 half-hour programs explore works of fiction, prose and poetry within their historical, social and cultural contexts. The videos are coordinated with the NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE, and are used in the United States as the basis of a one or two-semester university level course on American literature. 1.Native Voices Native Americans had established a rich and highly developed tradition of oral literature long before the writings of the European colonists. This program explores that richness by introducing Native American oral traditions through the work of three contemporary authors: Leslie Marmon Silko (Laguna Pueblo), Simon Ortiz (Acoma Pueblo), and Luci Tapahonso (Navajo). 2.Exploring Borderlands Chicana writer Gloria Anzaldza tells us that the border is "an open wound" where the lifeblood of two worlds is merging to form a third country - a border culture." This program explores the literature of the Chicano borderlands and its beginnings in the literature of Spanish colonization. Date: 2002 Availability: No items available:

13. American passages : 3. Utopian promise. 4. Spirit of Nationalism   Publication: Oregon Public Broadcasting From Annenberg/CPB 2002 . 60 min. , Series description: American Passages is a video series that looks at American literature, connecting major writers to those less often taught. The series takes an expanded view of American literary movements, bringing in a diversity of voices and tracing the continuity among them. The 16 half-hour programs explore works of fiction, prose and poetry within their historical, social and cultural contexts. The videos are coordinated with the NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE, and are used in the United States as the basis of a one or two-semester university level course on American literature. 3. Utopian Promise When British colonists landed in the Americas, they created communities that they hoped would serve as a "light onto the nations." But what role would the native inhabitants play in this new model community? This program compares the answers of two important groups, the Puritans and Quakers, and exposes the lasting influence they had upon American identity. 4. Spirit of Nationalism The Enlightenment brought new ideals and a new notion of selfhood to the American colonies. This program begins with an examination of the importance of the self-made man in Benjamin Franklin's autobiography, and then turns to the development of this concept in the writings of Romanticist Ralph Waldo Emerson. Date: 2002 Availability: No items available:

14. American passages : 5. Masculine heroes. 6. Gothic undercurrents   Publication: Oregon Public Broadcasting From Annenberg/CPB 2002 . 60 min. , Series description: American Passages is a video series that looks at American literature, connecting major writers to those less often taught. The series takes an expanded view of American literary movements, bringing in a diversity of voices and tracing the continuity among them. The 16 half-hour programs explore works of fiction, prose and poetry within their historical, social and cultural contexts. The videos are coordinated with the NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE, and are used in the United States as the basis of a one or two-semester university level course on American literature. 5. Masculine Heroes In 1898, Frederick Jackson Turner declared the frontier as the defining feature of American culture, but American authors had uncovered its significance much earlier. This program turns to three key writers of the early national period - James Fenimore Cooper, John Rollin Ridge, and Walt Whitman - and examines the influential visions of American manhood offered by each author. 6. Gothic Undercurrents What was haunting the American nation in the 1850s? The three writers treated in this program - Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Emily Dickinson - use poetry and prose to explore the dark side of nineteenth-century America. Date: 2002 Availability: No items available:

15. American passages : 7. Slavery and freedom. 8. Regional realism   Publication: Oregon Public Broadcasting From Annenberg/CPB 2002 . 60 min. , Series description: American Passages is a video series that looks at American literature, connecting major writers to those less often taught. The series takes an expanded view of American literary movements, bringing in a diversity of voices and tracing the continuity among them. The 16 half-hour programs explore works of fiction, prose and poetry within their historical, social and cultural contexts. The videos are coordinated with the NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE, and are used in the United States as the basis of a one or two-semester university level course on American literature. 7. Slavery and Freedom How has slavery shaped the American literary imagination and American identity? This program turns to the classic slave narratives of Harriet Jacobs and Frederick Douglass and the fiction of Harriet Beecher Stowe. What rhetorical strategies do their works use to construct an authentic and authoritative American self? 8. Regional Realism Set in the antebellum American South, but written after Emancipation, Mark Twain's novel THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN remains a classic of American literature. This program compares Twain's depiction of Southern vernacular culture to that of Charles Chestnutt and Kate Chopin, and in doing so, introduces the hallmarks of American Realism. Date: 2002 Availability: No items available:

16. American passages : 9. Social realism. 10. Rhythms in poetry   Publication: Oregon Public Broadcasting From Annenberg/CPB 2002 . 60 min. , Series description: American Passages is a video series that looks at American literature, connecting major writers to those less often taught. The series takes an expanded view of American literary movements, bringing in a diversity of voices and tracing the continuity among them. The 16 half-hour programs explore works of fiction, prose and poetry within their historical, social and cultural contexts. The videos are coordinated with the NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE, and are used in the United States as the basis of a one or two-semester university level course on American literature. 9. Social Realism This program presents the authors of the American Gilded Age, such as Edith Wharton, and juxtaposes them with social realists like Anzia Yezierska. These writers expose the double world that made up turn-of-the-century New York: that of the elite and that of the poorest of the poor. Which of these realities is the more truly American? 10. Rhythms in Poetry Amidst the chaos following World War I, Ezra Pound urged poets to "Make it new!" This call was heeded by a large range of poets, ranging from T. S. Eliot to Jean Toomer. This program explores the modernist lyrics of two of these poets: William Carlos Williams and Langston Hughes. What is modernism? How did these poets start a revolution that continues until this day? Date: 2002 Availability: No items available:

17. American passages : 11. Modernist portraits. 12. Migrant struggle   Publication: Oregon Public Broadcasting From Annenberg/CPB 2002 . 60 min. , Series description: American Passages is a video series that looks at American literature, connecting major writers to those less often taught. The series takes an expanded view of American literary movements, bringing in a diversity of voices and tracing the continuity among them. The 16 half-hour programs explore works of fiction, prose and poetry within their historical, social and cultural contexts. The videos are coordinated with the NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE, and are used in the United States as the basis of a one or two-semester university level course on American literature. 11. Modernist Portraits Jazz filled the air and wailed against the night. Caught in the sway, American prose writers sought out the forbidden -the slang, the dialects, and the rhythms of the folk and of everyday life. Writers such as Hemingway, Stein, and Fitzgerald forged a new style: one which silhouetted the geometry of language, crisp in its own cleanness. 12. Migrant Struggle Americans have often defined themselves through their relationship to the land. This program traces the social fiction of three key American voices: John Steinbeck, Carlos Bulosan, and Helena Marma Viramontes. | Educational Date: 2002 Availability: No items available:

18. American passages : 13. Southern renaissance. 14. Becoming visible   Publication: Oregon Public Broadcasting From Annenberg/CPB 2002 . 60 min. , Series description: American Passages is a video series that looks at American literature, connecting major writers to those less often taught. The series takes an expanded view of American literary movements, bringing in a diversity of voices and tracing the continuity among them. The 16 half-hour programs explore works of fiction, prose and poetry within their historical, social and cultural contexts. The videos are coordinated with the NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE, and are used in the United States as the basis of a one or two-semester university level course on American literature. 13. Southern Renaissance "My subject in fiction," Flannery O'Connor tells us, "is the action of grace in the territory held largely by the devil." One might do well to ask what, if not the devil, haunts the American South in this era between the wars. This program uncovers the revisioning of Southern myths during the modernist era by writers William Faulkner and Zora Neale Hurston. 14. Becoming Visible This program guides the viewer through the works and contexts of ethnic writers from 1945-1965. Starting with the works of Ralph Waldo Ellison, Philip Roth, and N. Scott Momaday, we explore the way writers from the margins took over the center of American culture. Date: 2002 Availability: No items available:

19. American passages : 15. Poetry of liberation. 16. Search for identity   Publication: Oregon Public Broadcasting From Annenberg/CPB 2002 . 60 min. , Series description: American Passages is a video series that looks at American literature, connecting major writers to those less often taught. The series takes an expanded view of American literary movements, bringing in a diversity of voices and tracing the continuity among them. The 16 half-hour programs explore works of fiction, prose and poetry within their historical, social and cultural contexts. The videos are coordinated with the NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE, and are used in the United States as the basis of a one or two-semester university level course on American literature. 15. Poetry of Liberation For many, the 1960s mark the true end of modern America. Whereas the modernists remained serious about the transcendent nature of art, the artists of the 1960s wanted an art that was relevant. They wanted an art that not only spoke about justice, but also helped create it. This program explores the innovations made in American poetry in the 1960s by Allen Ginsberg, Amiri Baraka, and Adrienne Rich. 16. Search for Identity Even as the poets were fostering a rebellion, contemporary prose writers began creating a new American Tradition comprised of many strands, many voices, and many myths about the past. This program explores the search for identity by three American writers: Maxine Hong Kingston, Sandra Cisneros, and Leslie Feinberg. Date: 2002 Availability: No items available:

20. The adventures of Huckleberry Finn   Publication: Discovery Communications, Inc. 1997 . 26 min. ; color & b/w , The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn This work grapples with one of the most powerful themes in American history--slavery. Tracing the roots of author Mark Twain, this video travels from Twain's home in Hannibal, Missouri, where the novel is set, to Hartford, Connecticut, where Twain also lived, to the waters of the Mississippi, the site of Huck and Jim's journey. McAvoy Layne, an actor who specializes in recreating Mark Twain, uses Twain's own scathing critiques and satirical letters to paint a portrait of the author and the world that inspired his masterpiece. Date: 1997 Availability: No items available: