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Founding fathers : the men who shaped our nation and changed the world (1)

Additional authors: Herrmann, Edward
Published by : MPH Entertainment Inc. for The History Channel Physical details: One DVD : 100 minutes ; color ISBN:076703094X. Year: 2000
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Visual Materials Visual Materials AIT 美國資料中心 AIT American Center

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DVD 973.3 Fou v.1 (Browse shelf) Not for loan 011630

All rights reserved. Volume One: REBELS WITH A CAUSE The birth of American democracy as attended by an extraordinary cast of characters, drawn from every level of colonial society. They brought to the cause of independence a dazzling array of talents and genius--and an equally noteworthy range of personality flaws and defects. Sam Adams was a rumpled, pugnacious man who failed at a variety of professions, before finding his niche as a revolutionary with a knack for inciting mob violence. John Hancock, a wealthy, aristocratic merchant, was also a known wine-smuggler with a major economic stake in breaking away from Britain. But the unique chemistry of this political "odd couple" would prove pivotal, combining to spark the fires of resentment which until then had been merely smoldering within the colonies. TAKING LIBERTIES In the aftermath of heavy British tax levies and the shock of the Boston Massacre, the situation in the American colonies grew more incendiary. Helping to fan the flames was the eloquent orator Patrick Henry, who rose from backwoods obscurity to marry into money and make the first open "call to arms." Meanwhile, Benjamin Franklin, actually slow to join the colonists' cause, was in London--desperately attempting to patch things up with King George. Across the Atlantic, George Washington, a retired soldier with a spotty military record, maneuvered for command of the rebel forces, while an alcoholic essay writer named Thomas Paine published "Common Sense," one of the period's most famous and inflammatory tracts.